3 Classic Songs to Learn on Acoustic Guitar

The acoustic guitar is most fun when you have songs you’re trying to learn to play. There a few classics that you should definitely know before you sit around a campfire with an acoustic again. Impress your friends and have fun learning a few classics!

Blackbird

Blackbird by the Beatles is a great beginner song. It has a very straightforward strumming pattern and only uses 4 chords in the same progression throughout the whole song – G major, C major, D major, and Emajor. Blackbird also does not have to be played fast at all. Theres no tricky chord changes or anything that will mess you up. Blackbird also gets progressively more difficult because it has one guitar playing the same thing over and over again for the verse, then comes in with a second part that is much harder, which can be learnt later when you are ready to work on Blackbird again.

The strumming pattern for Blackbird goes like this:

( x = a muted strum)

| G | E | E |

| G | E-x | E-x |

(then repeat that pattern for the rest of the song) Blackbird is only played with 4 chords:  E minor, A minor, B major 7th, and C major. The strumming pattern stays the same throughout the whole song too. Blackbirdmajor | C | D |

|-3—x—2—0—3-|

And Blackbird is played over and over again. Blackbird is actually just an easy way to practice switching between major and minor chords without you even realizing theres a change going on.

Landslide

Landslide by Fleetwood Mac is actually a very easy song to play on guitar as well, and you absolutely do not need to be able to sing too.

The strumming pattern for Landslide goes like this: ( x = a muted strum)

| E-x | E-x |

|-2—0—3-| -3—x—2—0-|

So the strumming pattern goes like this for the whole song:

( x = a muted strum)

| E-x E-x |E-x E-x |

| -2—0—3-| -3—x—2—0-|

And Landslide is played over and over again. The chord progression for Landslide goes like this: E minor, B major 7th, Fsharp major 9th, Gmajor

(Gmajor can also be played as Gsus4) Landslide is pretty similar to Blackbird actually, but has a few more chords. The key difference between the two songs is that you don’t have to play all of Blackbird at once, and the strumming pattern stays the same throughout the whole song. Landslide also gets progressively more difficult because it has one guitar playing the same thing over and over again for the verse, then comes in with a second part that is much harder, which can be learnt later when you are ready to work on Landslide again.

Free Fallin

Free Fallin by Tom Petty is definitely the most difficult song on this list, but it’s also one of the most popular songs to play on guitar. Free Fallin uses 6 chords. They are Cmajor, Dmajor, E major 7th, Fsharp minor 9th (also can be played as Fsharp major 9th), A minor, Gmajor, Amajor. The strumming pattern for Free Fallin goes like this: ( x = a muted strum)

| D | D | E-x E-x |

| -3—x—2-| -0—3—2-|

So the strumming pattern goes like this for the whole song:

( x = a muted strum)

| D | E-xE-x | A-xA-x |

| -3-| -0- | -2-|

And Free Fallin is played over and over again. The chord progression for Free Fallin goes like this: C major, Dmajor, E major 7th, Fsharp minor 9th (also can be played as Fsharp major 9th),

(Fsharp minor 9th can also be played as Fsharp major 9th) A minor, Gmajor, Amajor. Free Fallin is actually not that bad once you get past the intro part. The only tricky thing about Free Fallin are chords like Fsharp major 9th. Which are played in this pattern:

| E-xE-x | A-xA-x | E-xE-x | Fsus2Fsharp

| -0-| -2-| -3-|

Then you have the chords E minor, A minor,

(E major 7th can also be played as Esus4) Gmajor, Amajor. All of these chords stay the same throughout the whole song. So you just have to work on switching between them quickly.

Pro tip here: all of these songs will sound best either on a brand new guitar, or on golden age vintage guitars (1955-1960’s). Get the right guitar and string setup, and these songs will be really fun to practice.